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February 27, 2014

FLORIDA WILDLIFE UPDATE

The South American invader can grow up to four-and-a-half feet long and lays up to fifty eggs at a time.

(Thanks to Mark Schlesinger and RussellMc)

Comments

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But how do they taste?

Exactly, jon. If there's one thing North Americans know how to do it's hunting a species to near extinction.

Who's going to open the first Tegu Bell? El Tegu Loco? Teg-Fil-A?

Problem solved. Next?

As long as it doesn't sell insurance I'm okay with it.

What is a tegu lizard?

lizard? oh, i thought they were talking about palmetto bugs.

I think the poor critters are just misunderstood. Releasing more large ones in urban areas would help to create a dialogue.

"Biologists are setting traps in the Balm-Boyette Scrub Preserve to try to determine how big the problem is."

The problem is about four and a half feet long, laying 50 eggs at a time. That' show big the problem is.

Just a lizard? Whew! I thought it was a reality tv star from Venezuela.

Won't the boa constrictors eat the Tegus ?

No,Clank'. They are Tegu intolerant.

Sounds more like the newest Volkswagen model.

The smaller ones are sold as pets here; they're much more docile than monitors. However, they won't survive our winters outdoors, so we don't have the same problem.

I'd much rather deal with four-foot long Tegus than four-foot high Florida drivers.

Time to put some pygmy alligator tail on the grill.
If you can't beat 'em, eat 'em.

Biologists are setting traps in the Balm-Boyette Scrub Preserve to try to determine how big the problem is.

The article said they were four or fix feet long.
Must be a reporter on drugs, unaware of what he just
wrote. Or wrought?


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