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August 29, 2013

WHY WE STILL NEED NEWSPAPERS

Police respond to 911 call about 'giant spider'

Key Excerpt: The officer reported finding the spider, measuring about 2 inches in diameter, and disposing of it with a rolled-up newspaper.

(Thanks to Ralph, who says: "Charlotte?")

Comments

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Wuss.
I took Stewie out for a walk the other night without a light.
Under the live oak, I walked through an estimated 30 spider webs.
It was a valiant effort, but I survived with no injuries.

Forest Grove police said a teenage girl who was home alone Aug. 16 called 911 in the evening to report her home was being terrorized by a "massive freaking creature," KPTV, Portland, Ore., reported Wednesday.

Big deal. It's a spider, not a giant rat.

Was that news paper a registered weapon?

I have to wonder why they didn't see fit to fill it with, say, 20 bullet holes. Then claim it threatened the other officer.

Surely this was what Jeff Bezos had in mind when he bought the Washington Post.

I remember long ago when my teenage sister came to me with reports of a spider the size of a tarntula in her room. I thought it might be a big wood spider. I ventured to her room....a bit nervous. It turned out to be a Daddy-long-legs.

Why electronic newspapers will never last.

Police brutality as usual; why not use a Taser and take it into protective custody?

She first tried to reach her parents, family friends and neighbors. No luck. So, she called her best friend over, but said that girl couldn't kill the "massive" spider, either.

Makenna Sewell said her next move was to call the non-emergency police dispatch line.

"I didn't call 911," she said. "I didn't think it was that big of a deal. I basically called the dispatcher looking for advice."

It happened the night of Aug. 16. The girl told the dispatcher she had "a ridiculous question," before asking for help killing the spider. She described it as the size of a baseball and said a poisonous spider had recently bit her mother.

"I think that raised awareness for her and why she was so wanting to get help," Makenna's mother said.

What Makenna didn't say to the dispatcher is that she has muscular dystrophy and is in a wheelchair, and hitting and killing that spider would have been incredibly difficult.

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