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April 30, 2013


Invasive predator fish that can live out of water for days to be hunted in Central Park

(Thanks to Jay Brandes, funny man and Joel Farr)


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How long could one live in, say, a sixteen ounce sugary beverage?

Tally ho !

Predators in Central Park? Who knew?

This may just be a rumor but, I've heard Mayor Bloomberg wants the Statue Of Liberty to slim down. He's also asked that the torch be removed because it looks too much like a 32 ounce soda.

Snakeheads have been in the Potomac for several years. The original hysteria had them wiping out vast stretches of aquatic life. In real life, they have definitely had an impact but the ecosystem has also adapted.

Now the snakeheads near the Potomac on Capitol Hill are another story entirely.

Have you ever seen one of those snakeheads?
Reminds me of the time I caught a snapper and decided to let it go. After I got my pliers back, it just got to keep that hook.

I like this line from the story. "...and one was quietly observed in Harlem Meer several years ago." I'm no professionally trained journalist, but what relevance does the word "quietly" add? Perhaps the snakehead was not aware that it had been observed?

Nursecindy - PLEASE don't give Mayor Benito Hugo Kim Jong Bloomberg anymore more ideas...I beg you!

cindy, peopleare just counting down the days to December 31 when Mayorissimo Bloomberg makes like Nixon and rides his helicopter out of town for the last time (as Mayor).

Gregg, I doubt it was "quietly" either. More like, "Get that damn hook out of my mouth, you f#cking idiot!"

Bloomberg and the mayor of Detroit (yes, there is one who hasn't been indicted yet) are having a tiff over Bloomberg's assertion that NY's stop-n-frisk policies make it a safer city than Detroit. Detroit Mayor Dave Bing says, "Nuh-uh!"

Turns out they are dangerous if they survive to reach a decent size, but their young are just more protein in the ecosystem. In a hundred years they'll be gone.

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