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April 24, 2009

WHAT COULD POSSIBLY GO WRONG?

A Northern Territory Primary School has enrolled two poddy calves into its city classrooms this term as part of an innovative educational project. The project aims to make learning more interesting as well as showing children where food comes from.

(Thanks to Ralph Kirschner)

Comments

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What's next, a cow in the lab??

Talk about "Darwin Awards"! I'm sure that the little tikes will not only learn where food comes from, but where it ends up too!

So they want the children to become vegetarians?

Once you name 'em, you can't kill them and eat them...

Schools teaching kids how to produce bullsh@@ ?
The writeup will have to be submitted to the jury for the Bullitzer Prize.

They're (not their) probably being used as awards, NMUA. The calves are brought over to the author whose paper contains the most fertilizer.

great. now all the kids are going to want to chew their cud during class.

Once the semester is over, they'll fire up the grill and BBQ!

The plan is to use the cows to teach English?

I'd've thot they'd teach Australian, considerin' the location ...

OH ... mebbe the cows are imports from England?

How udderly ridiculous.

On second thought, veal medallions for lunch, kiddies!

You thought the runt in class had it bad. Wait until the bullies start cow tipping at recess.

Poddy training classes.

"Mrs. Nelson, Edna left some "extra credit" in the corner again!"

The cows probably think that they are going to get an education. That seems a cruel trick to play on them.

Allen said: "Once you name 'em, you can't kill them and eat them..."

If the cow was mean enough, the farm kids reaction is: "Oh good, we're having Roxie for dinner." Trust me, I married a farm kid.

Insert ' ^ up there.

So they're real poddy animals, huh?

No cow left behind?

Beef stewdents?

Wonder how many kids are going to claim that the cows ate their homework?

"...showing children where food comes from."
And on the eighth week it's veal every day for lunch.

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