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May 23, 2005

HEADLINE OF THE DAY SO FAR

(Thanks to Loran Waldron)

Comments

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"ingenious pleating"

WGANFARB?????

Herro, sairor!

Punky can tromp on my firsts anytime.

Oh wait, it gets better:

"With their devious ventilation panels and roomy, easily-hoiked cuffs..."

Didn't Jack from 24 foil the devious ventilation panels of China?

and can anybody define "hoiked"?

(D'art - really enjoyed tromping your firsts...was it good for you?)

*snork*
cunning,quirky.....yup...Japonese

Oh, man, can we do it again some other time?

I always thought "hoiked" had to do with trying to dislodge mucus, but maybe that's just me.

I'm just wondering if I'm the only one who didn't understand a freakin' word in that article? I mean, it seemed like it was only half-complete. Maybe it's just a Monday thing for me, right now?

And here I thot hoik meant something else entirely ...

... as in hoiked a loogie ...

oh, well, live and (one may only hope) learn ...

Sarcasmo, You'll be relieved that these cuffs are EASILY hoiked! (Gentle on the esophagus)

D'art - take a break...we go again in 5 minutes...

*wipes chocolate from around mouth*

Schadeboy: Me Too!!
Isn't hoiking what you have to do when your boicycle doesn't work?

All too often the no man’s land between work wear and mufti is supplied by platitudes

You know, I tell people this all the time, but does anybody listen? NO!

Glad to hear it Punky.

D'Art, a little heads up, just make sure Punky's not wearing those heels when she tromps on your firsts trust me on this one.

What the hell is a mufti anyway?

Whew, I just had a Japonaiserie movement.

DO NOT go in there!

*raises hand*

PUNKY!! I know this one.

Hoiked- To hack up a lung biscuit and cast it outwards usually from the mouth. As in, I hoiked a lugee off the bridge the other day and watched it spiral it's way down about 30 feet and hit the water, only to have the fish gobble it up. (mother's side of the family by marriage)

Mr. Fish - Correct! 10 points. Are you at all related to the Incredible Mr Limpet?

A big girl's blouse ??? I want one!!!

I think I may have dribbled, in my shorts.

I wish, I wish I was a fish. That's exactly what happened to me Punky! You get the Bonus prize for that one. (as soon as I figure out what that is)

*glub*

Isn't a mufti a cross between earmuffs and a necktie?

Doesn't this article read like it was translated from another language, say Japanese, by Babelfish??

Quite frankly, I'm not sure what Jack Bauer would think about this. It must be some time of terrorist plot by ImhoTerrorist to instill mass panic!

Quick, someone shoot someone in the thigh!

mufti - [second definition] plain clothes worn by a person who usually works in uniform, such as a police officer or soldier ... (sorry, my Tiger dictionary won't let me "copy and paste")

generally the opposite of "khaki", which originally (in one sense) was only used in reference to military uniforms ...

end of language/usage lesson -- sorry, not funny

well, if you dribbled in your shorts, maybe you could get an extra pair from saddam... the headline here, just the worst ive ever seen anywhere. and speaking for big girl blouses - none of the things in my closet are afraid!

my mother always told me not to hoik on my shirtsleeves (or cuffs, as the case may be).

So, according to the dictionary, "mufti" is broken down into the root, "muft" meaning "easily hoiked". And of course, "khak" is the opposite of "muft", literally: "Lungbutter that is so adhered to the side of your lungs that you must khak several times in order to dislodge it."

Sorry to be so particular, but it's not "hoiked" a lugy, it's "hawked" a lugy.

"hoik" according to the OED (I swear, I'm not making this up):
1. trans. To lift up or hoist, often with a jerk or rapid movement. Also to haul or turn out. Also transf. and fig.

versus "hawk" (OED.com again):
1. intr. To make an effort to clear the throat of phlegm; to clear the throat noisily.
2. trans. To bring up with a strong effort of clearing the throat. ...
along with my favorite quotation from the entry:
"1843 SIR T. WATSON Princ. & Pract. Phys. xxviii. (1871) 593 He hawked up in the course of the day a considerable quantity of ropy mucus."

"lugy," unfortunately, is not in the OED. How did they overlook that one?

Anybody looking for an editor?

M.N. --

Of course the OED (almost by its very name) does not always consider the onomatopaeic and/or colloquial pronunciation tendencies of we who use "American" English ...

Hoik is clearly an approximation of the spelling of the actual sound of such action. Other alt. spellings also are available, witness: lugy, loogy, loogie, looie, et al.

"As Western office workers have learnt."

Learnt? Is that the same as, "I Mournt Jeff at his funeral yesterday. I have to admit, I cryt."

"As Western office workers have learnt."

Learnt? Is that the same as, "I Mournt Jeff at his funeral yesterday. I have to admit, I cryt."

"..devious ventilation panels.." &
.."the exquisitely pained faces.." WBGNFARB

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