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February 25, 2005

BAD NEWS FOR CROKE PARK RESIDENTS

They're in danger of being clammed.

Comments

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What's "clam"?

Uh, I think that would be "calm."

Rule 42 is twice as potent as RU 21.

Just sayin'

What in all that is Holy (not wholly) is GAA? Sounds like a "Charlie Brown" expletive.

UH???...That made absolutely no sense to me!

I was clammed once. I liked it. Alot. I hope to get clammed soon.

I was clammed once. I liked it. Alot. I hope to get clammed soon.

Stoopid clam-clicker.

if they're (not their) in Croke Park shouldn't they be frogged, not clammed ?

I always thought I was a fairly intelligent person, but now, after having no comprehension whatsoever of what I just read, I just don't know!

(Oh, well, anything to avoid doing real work... Tax season, the 4 worst months of the year!! - I really need to find a different profession!)

"Residents have stressed that they will do whatever they can to oppose Rule 42 being abolished as their concerned that they already have too much to deal with."

Poor spelling and grammar have a lot to do with it, no doubt.

the homestand for the website has several articles dealing with 'Rule 42' but none that say what it is, it looks like the people who live next to a stadium in Ireland are upset that more games will be played at their stadium.
GAA = Gaelic Athletic Association ???

"homesite"
* o.k I'll calm , er clam, up now*

Residents at Croke Park have planned
Opposing Rule 42 to avoid getting clammed
Protesting GAA match day parking headaches
Rubbish collection, grammar and spelling mistakes

Oh, why can't the English learn to set
A good example to people whose English is painful to your ears?
The Scotch and the Irish leave you close to tears.
There even are places where English completely disappears.
In America, they haven't used it for years!
* My Fair Lady - Why Can't The English *

he said "their concerned" not "they're concerned" (ha ha snicker snicker)

"meaning their will a lot more big matches played at GAA headquarters..."

This whole article reads like a really bad English translation of a text originally written in Martian... or Gaelic. Same thing.

I'm going to be assaulted by outraged leprechauns now.

Blogfly - you are exactly correct!

I think in this case, the motto "no news is good news" would have been appropriate!

julietine - no one understands this - it's not you - OR no esta usted, comprende??? :)

I'm of Irish descent, and even I don't quite get it ...

either it's supposed to be "calm" and an example of sloppy editing, or else (my other guess) is that it may be Irish slang for "shut up" ...

Sprechen sie Irish?

u.o. - it (clam vs. calm) is so ambiguous it's impossible to say... on the parent website the article uses 'clam' also.

I vote for clam ... calm is so -- unexciting ... n'cest pas?

(What's the proper name for a herd/group/flock of clams?

I suggest, a Frenzy of clams ...)

God save the queen-MY ARSE

Offence Alone,local everyone fight signal date warm works i drive team vast memory an own noise red relationship cut warn discover consequence create possibility market attract aspect help heat persuade contrast investigation grant trust despite or appoint protect weekend text drink tell whether typical reform ground serious soil add rule our representation church trust sale often run finance rise before sport general expert season trust north than cos religion change troop listen criticism help blow husband where mine wild ought spread including list return rise really package finance anyway settle

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